About the NCO Historical Society

The NCO Historical Society is an online, central repository allowing free access to information and material relating to the US Army Noncommissioned Officer Corps.

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We seek to provide easy access for soldiers, historians, researchers or others seeking to learn more about the professional enlisted Corps of the United States Army.

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The curator and founder of the NCO Historical Society is available for lectures, presentation or professional development sessions on NCO History.

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Highest Combat decorated Noncommissioned of WWII

179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division

MSG Llewellyn Chilson photoT/Sgt MSG Llewellyn Chilson

MSG Llewellyn Chilson, US Army Retired

Born April 1, 1920 in Dayton, Ohio. His father, Frank W.Chilson, was a World War I veteran. He had schooling at Lincoln grade school, Akron and three years at South High School. Llewellyn has said of his youth, "I've always been a fighter. The neighbor hoods where I grew up in South Akron were pretty rough." At age sixteen he was working for Western Union. Before he was drafted he had been driving a long distance freight truck at $40 per week for Renner Motor Lines, Akron. Inducted at the local draftboard at 1311 Grant St., Akron, March 28, 1942.

Chilson became a corporal in April 1944, a buck sergeant and assistant squad leader in May. He was a technical sergeant by August 15, when he went ashore with his division in Southern France in Operation Anvil. By late fall, Chilson and his fellow soldiers were fighting in the Vosges Mountains, near German-held Denshein, France.

Months after V.E. Day, Lt. Col. Louis K. Hennighausen, Jr., commander of the 179th Infantry Regiment, submitted an August 3, 1945 recommendation that Chilson receive the Medal of Honor. The War Department considered the matter in 1946, but a majority of the Board disapproved the Medal of Honor. “The recommendation,” wrote the Board, “reveals a highly commendable performance as a platoon leader, but does not clearly establish incontestable proof of conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty.” As a result of the Board’s August 1946 decision, the European Theater recommendation for a Medal of Honor was returned to the command, which then awarded the three Distinguished Service Crosses, a second Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star and second Purple Heart–all of which Chilson received from Truman.

On May 24, 1961, he was seriously injured in a transport plane crash at McChord Air Force Base in Washington. He was one of only four people to survive. The crash killed 24 service members.

One-man army,  Mark J. Price, Beacon Journal, May 30, 2005

 

Announcements:


Selected Awards and Decorations:
Distinguished Service Cross with two oak leaf clusters
Silver Star with two oak leaf clusters
Legion of Merit
Bronze Star with “V” Device and two oak leaf clusters
Purple Heart with two oak leaf clusters
Presidential Unit Citation
American Campaign Medal
European African Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with four Bronze Service Stars and one Bronze arrowhead
World War II Victory Medal
Army Occupation Medal (Germany)
Army Commendation Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Combat Infantry Badge
Good Conduct Medal
French Croix de Guerre with palm

Chilson meets Audie Murphy at the Ft Hood NCO Academy

The Photo in question was allegedly taken at Fort Hood, Texas on June 6th, 1952 when Audie made a Speech to the Fort Hood NCO Academy as a National Guardsman and Chilson was an active duty Instructor at the Academy.

Biography and history of Llewellyn Cilson, by the 45th Infantry Division Association
Courtesy 45th Infantry Division Association


 
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